What are your views on alternative energy research?

Question by andrew 4: What are your views on alternative energy research?
I just want to know what you think about researching alternative ways for green energy.

Such as wind turbines and solar cells, and what not.

Best answer:

Answer by Anis Hamdani
Alternative energy resources should be researched not only due to global warming problems but also due to depletion of fossil fuel reserves. Moreover, the survival of mankind depends on finding alternative energy sources. But I am sure the Big Oil Companies will not let the alternative energy sources developed due to vested interests.

According to my observation the funding for alternative energy research will not be available until there is a military benefit to the countries.

What do you think? Answer below!

4 Responses to “What are your views on alternative energy research?”

  1. I do my best to save energy and inform others to save resources for our future generation. It’s now even easier to save money on your business utility bills with very little effort or expense. Not only will you reduce the cost of powering home or office but you’ll also improve your green credentials and reduce your carbon footprint.

  2. Totally for it.

    The US operates on about 10% renewable or alternative energy sources right now and I think we should definitely keep looking for ways to keep harnessing and improving on these numbers. Anything we can do to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and switch over to alternative energy is great. It not only makes us a more independent nation it makes us a greener, cleaner, healthier, and wealthier nation as well with greater prospects for our future.

    The majority of what we use right now is #1 Biomass/Bio-fuel and Hydroelectric at a close second. I hope that we can start more wind energy programs. Biomass is great because it creates a potential way to get rid of our garbage problem (which is another substantial problem) while providing energy…so it is a double victory) The fact that it is responsible for 51% of our renewable energy sources is great!

    Wind, geothermal, and solar energy technology on a mass scale are somewhat harder to use because they need large open spaces to work productively, they are expensive and with geothermal there isn’t a source available geologically to every nation.

    The geothermal energy plant technology is totally there if we had more areas within the US to take advantage of it we would be set. It is relatively easy to tap into and almost nonexistent as far as cost goes to operate once you do. It is just a matter of finding those darn underground patches of volcanic activity. About 30-35% of Iceland is fueled by geothermal power now.

    I hope that research will fine tune wind and solar energy so that it can become affordable for the everyday Joe like myself and there could be the potential to have a wind turbine or solar panel in my backyard or on my roof in the next 10 years with out costing me $ 30,000 like it would now to install the solar. (I have researched it and had companies out to do solar assessments multiple times) As it is it is still just too expensive for many to make it a reality even with incentives and tax rebates.

  3. definitely positive to not only provide the world with clean energy technologies but also to ensure better energy efficiency, improve our energy independence and provide energy security by diversifying energy portfolio, sadly energy research still fail to reduce the costs of alternative energy, and this is currently the biggest drawback of alternative energy research.

    http://renewableenergyarticles.blogspot.com/2009/12/what-does-renewable-energy-need-to.html

  4. The efficiency of solar energy depends on the materials used to make each solar cell. A solar cell is that portion of a solar panel in which sunlight is collected and converted to solar electricity.

    The materials within each cell that perform this valuable duty are called semiconductors. The efficiency of a solar cell is measured as the percentage of the total sunlight striking the cell that is converted into electricity by the cell.

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