Clean Break: The Story of Germany’s Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single) Reviews

Clean Break: The Story of Germany’s Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single)

Clean Break: The Story of Germany's Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single)

The European Union’s biggest and most powerful industrial economy is making a clean break from coal, oil and nuclear energy. It is doing something most Americans would say is impossible, but already Germany is running on 25% clean energy and it is on track to reach 80 percent by 2050. Some experts say it could reach 100 percent by then.

But Germany’s energiewende, or energy transformation, is really a very American story that revolves around self-reliant individuals in a responsive democracy forging a national can-do vision.

“…..a riveting account of Germany’s energy revolution.” The Ecologist

“This book contains a nice combination of interviews, stories, and examples of how Germany is transitioning from a fossil fuel and nuclear infrastructure to a clean, renewable one. It is an important and eye-opening analysis that should be read by anyone interested in emulating this feat in other countries.”
Mark Z. Jacobson, Director, Atmosphere/Energy

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3 Responses to “Clean Break: The Story of Germany’s Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single) Reviews”

  1. Loyd E. Eskildson "Pragmatist" Reply March 8, 2013 at 1:18 pm
    14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Impressive, Important Information, November 23, 2012
    By 
    Loyd E. Eskildson “Pragmatist” (Phoenix, AZ.) –
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Clean Break: The Story of Germany’s Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single) (Kindle Edition)

    A majority of Germans believe their future lies in renewable energy, and the government has set a target of 80% renewable power by 2050, with a 35% target for 2020. Twenty-five percent of its electricity now comes from solar, wind and biomass, vs. 6% for the U.S. Eighty percent oppose nuclear power. All major political parties endorse these directions.

    The average German household pays about $108/month for electricity ($110 in the U.S.), with a renewable energy surcharge (paid to cover the bonus paid for electricity fed into the grid by renewables) accounting for $11.50 of that amount. ‘Electricity intensive’ businesses are exempted from paying the surcharge to avoid giving foreign manufacturers an economic advantage. Germans choose from over 800 smaller, decentralized electric companies.

    A German homeowner pays $10,000 to install a typical rooftop system vs. a U.S. homeowner paying $20,000 for the same system. The difference is entirely due to the German focus on reducing deployment costs. Permitting fees that can run into the thousands of dollars in the U.S. cost nothing, or close to it, in Germany; the rest comes from installers streamlining their operations due to the high volumes.

    Germans are 10X more likely to travel by bicycle than Americans, partly due to taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel (eg. $3.29 in the U.S. vs. $7.80 in Germany). Germans use public transport nearly 6X the rate of Americans in large cities, 18X that for small-to-medium-sized towns. Meanwhile, oil-rich Saudi Arabia recently announced its own $100 billion program to develop solar power – more ambitious than anything in the works in the U.S.

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  2. 12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Must-read for anyone interested in renewable energy, November 12, 2012
    By 
    SLacey

    This review is from: Clean Break: The Story of Germany’s Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single) (Kindle Edition)

    I don’t think the story of Germany’s renewable energy transition could be told enough here in America. Germany has shown that large industrialized nations can make great strides in deploying massive amounts of renewables and efficiency. It is a story about how an industrialized economy puts the pieces in place for a fundamental energy transition — not just sprinkling a bit of renewables on top of the existing energy system.

    I highly recommend the book. It’s a quick and detailed read. Always good to remind ourselves of what real leadership on these issues looks like.

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  3. 8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    The Sun Giveth — So Does Davidson, November 19, 2012
    By 

    This review is from: Clean Break: The Story of Germany’s Energy Transformation and What Americans Can Learn from It (Kindle Single) (Kindle Edition)

    Who knew how much the Germans know?

    What they know we now know, thanks to Osha Gray Davidson. And it’s that renewable energy works. In crisp, clear, highly readable fashion Davidson explains how Germany learned from an American President — Jimmy Carter — that conservation is not only good for the soul, but it’s good for the planet. While later American presidents tossed out the solar panels Carter had installed on the White House roof and turned up the thermostat, Germany decided he was right and began its drive to save energy and turn to renewable resources. Everything from the sun and wind to wood chips have been put to use, while consumption of fossil fuels has decreased proportionately.

    In other words, despite the doubters and naysayers, it can be done. An industrialized country, even one far to the north, one where the sun don’t shine very much, can power itself significantly with solar energy.

    Davidson deserves major credit for bringing us this story, one which until now was ignored by America’s news media.

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